Squaring PH10MQ

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  • Squaring PH10MQ

    We had one of our PH10MQ heads go bad....Luckily it was still under warranty for another 2 months. Got the new one in today. What is the best way to square the head.

    Tim

  • #2
    Tim,
    Here's what we do put in some bolts in the x axis holes(parallel to each other) and lay a straight edge up against the two bolts threaded in. Set you tip angle to a 45° b -90° and then move the styli don to the straight edge so that it is just off the edge in the y axis. Now disbale your y axis and move up so that you can change probe angles. Change to a 45° and b 90° and move down to the straight edge again. Adjust your head. Repeat. Until you are satisfied head is square.
    sigpic

    James Mannes

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    • #3
      You can place a module with a stylus in it facing up. In A0B0 position the ruby of your PH10 over thr ruby (or any small object) on the granite. Turn off the X axis on the jog box and move thr probe away to rotate it. Rotate to A90B0 then move the ruby over the object on the granite. Then all you need to do is rotate it in so it is positioned over the object on the granite. Go to A0B0 to confirm iit is aligned.

      Craig
      Last edited by craiger_ny; 05-16-2006, 12:52 PM.
      <internet bumper sticker goes here>

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      • #4
        Can't you measure a tip at A0B0 then one at A90B90 and compare the Y offset values? The other methods are good for rough alignement. But then again it depends on exactly how square you need the probe head...
        Links to my utilities for PCDMIS

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        • #5
          We only need ours "eyeballed" square. I don't know about your method cmmguy, I've never tried it. I suppose it should but how much of the error would be due to mechanics and mathematics? You are right it is all up to how close to machine axis you need it aligned.
          <internet bumper sticker goes here>

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          • #6
            Originally posted by craiger_ny
            We only need ours "eyeballed" square. I don't know about your method cmmguy, I've never tried it. I suppose it should but how much of the error would be due to mechanics and mathematics? You are right it is all up to how close to machine axis you need it aligned.
            Well, I sorta eyeball it. I use 2x4x6 blocks, and square up the head. Been doing since I started over 15 years ago, And I bet someone will tell me I been wrong the whole time. But I never have had anytthing sent back telling me my numbers where wrong. Now I alway do a 100% visual of my programs for shanking.
            sigpicSummer Time. Gotta Love it!

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            • #7
              I take a 4" gage block and have it run aling one of the axis. Next put the longest setup you can(within reason). Next a a0b0 measure the gage block with the probe window open and get gage block 'aligned' physically to the axis. Then I rotate to have the probe at 90 to measure one end of the gage block. rotate 180 degrees and measure again. I have had shank problems in the past and it will get ya every time. By doing it this way you are using an axis(which is mechanically square to other axis) and then the probe is also square to the axis. Never had had a problem by doing it this way!!! LOL

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              • #8
                Question , Do you not have to have the machine remapped after installing an new head ?
                Global 3.7 MR3
                Mistral 3.5 MR2
                Windows XP

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                • #9
                  I try to get it as square to the machine as we can since we use a lot of small tips. I've measured small holes and have had the tip measure one side and the shank on the other because the head or the star probe was not aligned to the machine very well. I usually calibrate the tips an compare the x or y values to see how in line they are to the machine.

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                  • #10
                    One of the easyest methods I have used is to put a pencil in one of the threaded holes on the rock eraser side down, rotate the head to 90 - 90 and center a ruby over the tip of the pencil, then rotate 90 - -90 and move the ruby over the pencil again. When the ruby centers over the pencil in both directions you are pretty square. I will also use a last word indicator on the side of the TP20 to finish up, We do a lot of small holes and to reduce the chance of shanking I want the thing really square.
                    sigpic Eye Yam Sofa King We Todd It.

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                    • #11
                      One of the easyest methods I have used is to put a pencil in one of the threaded holes on the rock eraser side down, rotate the head to 90 - 90 and center a ruby over the tip of the pencil, then rotate 90 - -90 and move the ruby over the pencil again.
                      What he said.
                      Lately, it occurs to me
                      What a long, strange trip it's been.

                      2017 R1 (Offline programming)

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by gage guru
                        I take a 4" gage block and have it run aling one of the axis. Next put the longest setup you can(within reason). Next a a0b0 measure the gage block with the probe window open and get gage block 'aligned' physically to the axis. Then I rotate to have the probe at 90 to measure one end of the gage block. rotate 180 degrees and measure again. I have had shank problems in the past and it will get ya every time. By doing it this way you are using an axis(which is mechanically square to other axis) and then the probe is also square to the axis. Never had had a problem by doing it this way!!! LOL
                        It is good to use longest set-up assuming that only your head is not square, and your extensions are straight and threads are square. Other wise you adjusting only this set-up and it might be not square for the other one.
                        N.

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                        • #13
                          What I do

                          What I do is run a tenth indicator along the side of the square part of the head from as mag base and adjust until zero.
                          sigpicV2014mr1

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                          • #14
                            pcdmisexpert,
                            you're kidding, right?????
                            Links to my utilities for PCDMIS

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                            • #15
                              What I do is put in ALL the extensions the PH9 can hold and rotate it to 90,0. I then run it up so that the sides of the extensions are close to the shaft of the cal-tool. I then run it back and forth in the Y axis and keep adjusting until I am happy with how close it is along the length of the extensions. I get it within 0.020" over 250mm of length. That's good enough for me.
                              sigpic
                              Originally posted by AndersI
                              I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

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