Tolerance Blocks on drawings

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  • Tolerance Blocks on drawings

    We are having some discussions here regarding tolerance blocks and the correct usage of them. We have our "standard" tolerance block. Any dimensions that require a different tolerance are shown with a tolerance on the print. When we receive a customer print with a tolerance block different than ours, a note is added to the drawing that shows the customers tolerance block. Here is the problem, no flag is placed near the tolerance block on our print. I've seen a number of manufacturing personnel stop looking once they see the "standard" tolerance block. I feel this is poor practice by Engineering/Drafting. I'd like to hear everyone else's thoughts.
    When in doubt, post code. A second set of eyes might see something you missed.
    sigpic

  • #2
    and then they will build a gage that dont match either tol group !!!
    DR Watson shut me down again !!!! :mad: Smoke break:eek:

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    • #3
      I don't think you should have 2 tol. blks on a single drawing. Personal pref.
      I'm not sure, but I think the line convention group (asme) might have a standard for that, but don't quote me.
      It would seem you would want a simpler drawing, not a more complicated one. Why can't you omit yours when the customers goes on, and visa versa??
      i wouldn't like that.

      What about crossing (X) one out???
      I've seen JIS and DIN and ISO and ASME done this way...
      Kev
      RFS Means Really Fussy Stuff

      When all you have is a hammer - everything looks like a nail....
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      • #4
        I feel that if there is a deviation to the general tolerance, then it nefinately needs a flag or a note. All personel involved needs to be able to read a print and that includes paying attention to the details of the print.

        A.Gore
        sigpicA.Gore

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        • #5
          I see where that could get confusing. I see where some may take advantage and go with the biggest tolerance or that conforms with there need. I personlly would not have two blocks. But in the end I would have to say whose is the end user, and use there block.
          sigpicSummer Time. Gotta Love it!

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          • #6
            I'm a bit lost... the customers print has the block on it.. how did your company get there block on the dwg to..
            sigpic
            if you had soap on a rope it would be tied to yer ankle

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            • #7
              I'm guessing at an answer to Tom's question because I'm working on PPAP's at this time with prints in which our customr has pasted their customer's prints onto their own title blocks.

              In this case I only have 1 tol block but can easily see a scenario that would have 2 tol blocks. If I were to see prints with 2 tol blocks I would not accept them from our eEng Dept until one of them was removed or crossed out.
              Perry
              B&S Mistral
              3.207 Beta on XP

              Older'n dirt

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              • #8
                Well some drawings have the tolerance block for the dimensions shown on the drawing and then they will have another tolerance block for features or dimensions that are not dimensioned or specified .

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                • #9
                  We create our own drawing. So it isn't really 2 tolerance blocks, but our tolerance block, and then a note with tolerances in it.

                  IE Note 5. Tolerances UOS
                  .XXX +/-.010
                  .XX +/-.030


                  So which UOS applies? It can put you in a loop, cause the drawing tol block also says UOS.
                  When in doubt, post code. A second set of eyes might see something you missed.
                  sigpic

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                  • #10
                    I would guess any dimensioned areas marked with a 5 will have those particular tolerances you are showing us applied, and any not marked with a 5 would default to the other tolerance block. Thats how I would personally read it
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rebeldude
                      I would guess any dimensioned areas marked with a 5 will have those particular tolerances you are showing us applied, and any not marked with a 5 would default to the other tolerance block. Thats how I would personally read it
                      Yes, but they aren't flagging any dimensions. Just a note with a different tolerance block. Hence my frustration. Really ticks of the setup guys when I have to show them their part is out of tolerance because they looked at the drawing they way they have for 20 years!
                      When in doubt, post code. A second set of eyes might see something you missed.
                      sigpic

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                      • #12
                        John,
                        It seems to me that I spend all day long ticking people off! But if nothing is flagged, then so be it right? Unless the print is updated, or if they sign something stating otherwise, then you got to go by what imformation is handed to you.
                        Last edited by rebeldude; 04-21-2006, 09:33 AM.
                        sigpic

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                        • #13
                          I'm in the same boat. Tick 30 people off by doing the job right. Tick off my boss, his boss and myself by bending to their whims. In the end I report to the QC Manager, President of the company, Customers, and Myself. QC is a thankless job at times, but I love and live it.
                          When in doubt, post code. A second set of eyes might see something you missed.
                          sigpic

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                          • #14
                            LOL. You got that right!
                            Last edited by rebeldude; 04-21-2006, 09:34 AM.
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                            • #15
                              Yeah, it's nice to be able to sleep good at night knowing you did your best...And not having to sit there in a pool of sweat with a 40 ounce and a loaded shotgun - hoping to pass out...
                              RFS Means Really Fussy Stuff

                              When all you have is a hammer - everything looks like a nail....
                              sigpic

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