Newbie on a lot of levels

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  • Newbie on a lot of levels

    Hi gang,
    I'm not sure if this is the right section of this thread forum to post this, but I'm sure you'll let me know if it's not......

    After 5 years on a manual (Tutor) CMM (Gage 2000) for my current company, I am now attending school at the Rhode Island facility for PC-DMIS 4.2 after Facilitating the purchase of a Global 7-10-7 CMM.

    I'm bringing the CAD file and a sample part for one of our products, and I'm hearing from others who have taken the course, that they felt that the one-week training was very limited.

    I consider myself "bright" enough to catch on, but I'm figuring the "productivity curve" to be about 2 months before I'm really producing satisfactory results on the new CMM in our plant.

    How realistic is that time frame.....any "heads up" crashes that you want to tell me about? I don't want to "crash and burn" with my company.

    -Soupy1957
    sigpic"I used to know what I was doing, but that was before I forgot!"

    -Soupy1957
    PC-DMIS 4.2/4.3MR 1
    Tutor

  • #2
    If you are on your own to learn the software... you have a long long road ahead of you. Most training facilities do not have the time in a week to cover all the topics, they do try to cover a great deal but if you get to much info it will confuse the heck out of you, so they limit the training to the basics. Taking a part from you facility is by far the best training you can get, but remember that every part is different so try and pick a part, possibly not the most complexed, that will give you the best overall training experience.... other than that... good luck. And remember that there are always lots of people on here to help with the challenges on your road to PC-DMIS ****... I mean heaven. HaHa

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    • #3
      I took the course a year ago and if you have plate inspection knowldege and have worked a CMM before even a manual one you will do ok. I was nervous when I heard it was very complexed and your brain would be fried, but I felt that only about 1 of the 4 days, You need to let your bosses know you will definately need time on the machine alone and unharrased to get to know it better. I myself went over the labs again and then started small and moved up. This forum is incredible helpful it helps alot. Good Luck
      Since I gave up hope I feel much better !!!

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      • #4
        I figure I'll understand it on some level, since I already have some experience, and I do sense the "boss" understanding that it will take some time to become proficient.

        I think the biggest drawback is going to be the limited amount of RAM in the computer provided with the CMM, since our CAD files can be quite complex.

        Yet another Purchase Order I'll have to fill out and submit that the boss will "love."

        Thanks for your responses! You don't KNOW how happy I am that folks are responding quickly in here, and that I have this resource to fall back on.

        -Soupy1957
        sigpic"I used to know what I was doing, but that was before I forgot!"

        -Soupy1957
        PC-DMIS 4.2/4.3MR 1
        Tutor

        Comment


        • #5
          Don't expect to get too heavy into programming from CAD if you are in the basic class. We spent about 1/2 a day on programming from CAD. You will be mostly concentrating on learned and autofeatures.

          While taking a complex part to class to get questions answered is a good idea, when you get back, start simple. Get lots and lots of practice right after you finish training (before you forget). Also, be sure to frequent here and ask plenty of questions.

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          • #6
            Yes, if you are going to be handling large CAD files you will need a lot of memory and processing power. The basic class shows you how most of the basic features of the software operate. Since you have experience programming/operating, you should be ok. I think your two month time frame is a very good estimate. You may be proficient after only 1 month, depending on your parts and ability to adapt to pc-dmis, in which case you will look even better to the boss. Goodluck to you.
            sigpic"Hated by Many, Loved by Few" _ A.B. - Stone brewery

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            • #7
              Welcome to our world. Can't say much that hasn't been said. Ask questions here, this is a great way to learn. Kind of like having many other programmers in your office.
              Once you get going visit the off-topic side, and start drinking beer. (or whiskey)
              When in doubt, post code. A second set of eyes might see something you missed.
              sigpic

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              • #8
                Start getting wasted immediately. Visit here often and you'll be fine.

                What kind of parts will you be inspecting? I ask because CAD has some good fits and some poor fits. Sheet metal, complex shapes and formed/cast parts CAD will save your butt on. Machined parts it will likely save you nothing more than typing all of the nominals in but you'll still have to edit. I found that CAD saved me nothing with the parts we make here so don't feel that CAD is a must.

                Remember kids, do lots of drugs, stay away from school, and drink heavily. Otherwise PCDMIS will get you.
                <internet bumper sticker goes here>

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                • #9
                  I started with PC-DMIS V3.5 with no training. I had to use CAD since the new parts we were working on did not have detail drawings.
                  Yes, I struggled. But in about 3 months I was confident that what I was programming was accurate.
                  Now, I find that programming from CAD models is MUCH easier than programming without it.
                  This forum helped a lot.
                  Read through all of the old posts. There are many dilemas that get solved here. Never give up on a problem. Keep at it till you get it solved.
                  I think having no training helped me in the long run. I did spend a lot of time doing things the "hard" way, but since I had to figure this stuff out by myself, it stayed with me. There was no one to solve my problems so I had to get it figured out.
                  Lately, it occurs to me
                  What a long, strange trip it's been.

                  2017 R1 (Offline programming)

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                  • #10
                    Hey Man,

                    Good luck and welcome to the club. It's along road, and you are all alone. No one but you knows what you have to go through to get the data your company wants, and if you could explain it, you've barely scratched the surface.
                    The best bet is to keep it simple, and for your first year just keep the machine moving, with accurate results.
                    When I've looked back at the programs I made in the late 90's with 2.8, and all the variables & scripting we had to put in them I laugh. My programming style has solidified in the last 4 years, but that is after 10 years of this game.



                    G
                    sigpic

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                    • #11
                      I brought the part and CAD file with me, but Shawn really didn't have any time to devote to it with me. We mostly used the block they provided.

                      Then I found out this week, that the origin as shown on the CAD does not necessarily reflect the "intended origin" (stated by the Engineer who designed the dang thing), and that has me ALL balled up.

                      -Soupy1957
                      sigpic"I used to know what I was doing, but that was before I forgot!"

                      -Soupy1957
                      PC-DMIS 4.2/4.3MR 1
                      Tutor

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by soupy1957 View Post
                        I brought the part and CAD file with me, but Shawn really didn't have any time to devote to it with me. We mostly used the block they provided.

                        Then I found out this week, that the origin as shown on the CAD does not necessarily reflect the "intended origin" (stated by the Engineer who designed the dang thing), and that has me ALL balled up.

                        -Soupy1957
                        Oh gear up. You will see that more often than not.
                        sigpic

                        James Mannes

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                        • #13
                          If you create your own iges or stp files you can set the origin anywhere you want. If not then you are at the mercy of the engineer. You can always ask for a origin where you want it to be. I create my own and place and orientate them where and how I want. It makes programming easier.
                          sigpic GDTPS - 0584

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