What exactly are QuickFeatures good for?

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  • What exactly are QuickFeatures good for?

    I am measuring a big plate that has, among other things, 14 holes threaded to 1/4-20. Since I do not have any probe that can accurately measure the minor diameter by itself without getting in the threads (yes, I know I can set pitch, but it is still not accurate since the threads would all have to start at the exact same angle on the circle) I have decided to use a gauge pin fit exactly to the hole to measure the true-position of each one. A little tedious, but still faster than doing it all by hand without CMM. Anyway...

    These holes are all "A" holes. (haha yeah a bunch of A-holes, right?) What I am attempting to do, as was promised by Hexagon to be a handy method, is use the QuickFeature after creating the first hole's parameters to the rest of the identical holes, including the inverted depth of the circle and flipping it to an OD.

    I open Auto Circle, name it A1_CIRC, set up the z-offset to hit the pin, invert the circle to an OD, and turn off Circular Moves toggle. Circle A1 is now measured exactly how I want it and giving me a good position measurement for X and Y. I want these settings applied 13 more times on the CAD.

    Next, when I close the dialog and Shift+click on the next circle, A2, it supposedly makes a "QuickFeature" that uses my exact same last parameters as the A1 circle. Only it doesn't. It turns Circular Moves back on. It puts the hits down inside the hole, and it turns it back into an ID. So I am still left going into each of the 13 additional circle features with F9 and re-configuring all my paths and settings. It actually takes more time, because I could just click the CAD once and set them the way I want the first time.

    What good is this "QuickFeature" method that does NOT copy your parameters over to the next feature created? I feel like it's not doing what I was told it would do. I think it would be faster to just Ctrl+C/Ctrl+V the same circle 13 times and then key-in the nominal X and Y positions and rename them accordingly. Any thoughts?

  • #2
    I've no experience with QuickFeatures so can't comment, but what sort of tolerance do your hole positions have?

    The pitch function is pretty good. Where the thread starts around the hole is irrelevant really.

    Automettech - Automated Metrology Technology

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    • UseAsIs
      UseAsIs commented
      Editing a comment
      They have a +/- .005" X and Y legacy tolerance (not True Position) and +/- .005 diameter tolerance. You're right that the pitch function would give me a good position, but it would need to be perfectly on the minor dia. of the threads to give me a passing diameter. Which is not a big deal since I can always buy it off with pins.

      I asked about getting a cylindrical probe this morning for threaded holes, and they are pretty receptive, I think that will help a lot. I can just probe them normally with that

    • NinjaBadger
      NinjaBadger commented
      Editing a comment
      Cylinder probes are rubbish - you cannot guarantee you are exactly square to the hole and you will get errors.

      Measure with pitch and just don't report the diameter.

      Thread should be checked with a thread go-no go, not a pin.

    • UseAsIs
      UseAsIs commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks NB, I agree with you about the thread gauge vs pins. Our print has a bubble for minor diameter in the threaded holes, however, and so must be reported in the final inspection report in addition to the go/no-go acceptance of the thread gauge. Is it overkill? Yes. But the customer wants it reported so that's what they'll get. I was mostly just screwing around with the CMM in those holes to see if I could get them to report in-tol, but it may be a lost cause.

      What are cylinder probes good for, if not for situations like threaded holes? finding edges maybe?

  • #3
    There might have been a bit of communications mismatch - I don't think the QuickFeatures follow the last settings from the AutoCircle dialog, they follow default settings made in the MSE (Measurement Strategy Editor).

    You can set up as many different parameter sets as you want in the MSE, then if you Shift-Doubleclick on a circle, you get this little black 'dialog' where you can click the drop down and select your parameter set (you can also click on the gear and change some settings, number of hits for example).

    QuickShDblCl.PNG

    If all the circles are in the same plane, you first click the plane, then shift-doubleclick one and all of them will be selected (and what you select for the first will be default for the rest, but still possible to change).
    Last edited by AndersI; 04-25-2019, 05:05 AM.
    AndersI
    SW support - Hexagon Metrology Nordic AB

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    • UseAsIs
      UseAsIs commented
      Editing a comment
      Thanks for the tip! I will try this out, it could be helpful for this and similar situations.

      As for the communication, I hate to be contrary but it is exactly what the PCDMIS instructors said and exactly what it says in the course handbook. https://i.postimg.cc/gzwZnXjk/20190425-073609.jpg

  • #4
    You can also copy and paste parameters. In summary window right click first circle and "copy parameters", highlight all other circles you want with same parameters, right click and "paste parameters".

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    • UseAsIs
      UseAsIs commented
      Editing a comment
      That almost sounds too easy lol can it be that simple? It won't ask me to sign for my immortal soul first?

  • #5
    Should be able to do Paste with Pattern assuming that they are evenly spaced.

    Another method would be to use variables for your X and Y coordinates. Copy the code however many times you need and then edit the X/Y's

    Or even copy and paste your feature and edit directly in the code.

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