Reorientation of Fixture help

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  • Reorientation of Fixture help

    Morning,
    The company I work for has finally decided to toss out the old Cordax 1808 dcc mea and has now purchased a Global S Green. Now here's where I might have an issue and could use some assistance. I have a fixture that I setup, its 4" Y+ and 36" in the X+ direction (Cordax). I need to take that fixture and now orientate it to 4" X+ and 36" Y+ (Global). Is it as easy as just rotating my alignement in the existing program? What other ways can I go about accomplishing reorientation of the fixture on the new CMM using the existing program. We need to maintain the same Vector Points and dimensions created in the prg.
    Any help is much appreciated. I dont get to program everyday, so my programing skills get rusty.

  • #2
    The ONLY thing you should have to do is change the probe angles to match the new setup, everything else should be golden.

    OR

    You could rotate the head 90 degrees, the same way the fixture is rotated, then no changes would be needed EXCEPT for telling Pcdmis which way the head points (F5 ~ Part/Machine ~ PROBE HEAD ORIENTATION)
    sigpic
    Originally posted by AndersI
    I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

    Comment


    • #3
      We are assuming that you still have a manual alignment in the program? The 4" and 36" seem quite specific - it's not straight into DCC from MCS is it?
      PC-Dmis V3.7 to 2011MR2 DatapageRT/Datapage+
      Global, Sheffield, Tracker, Leitz, PMM
      Never confuse movement with action!

      Comment


      • SI_GUY_29
        SI_GUY_29 commented
        Editing a comment
        Yes there is a manual alignment and than the program heads into dcc afterwards. I have marked sets created that split the alignment itself from the inspection part of the program.

    • #4
      You could change the coordinates of the machine under F5. So your long axis is X and short axis is Y, replicating the old 1808.

      Comment


      • #5
        Originally posted by BKulpa View Post
        You could change the coordinates of the machine under F5. So your long axis is X and short axis is Y, replicating the old 1808.
        I think you would have to do that for every program, with the inherit risk of program slimming, and it will still require changing all the probe angles in each program. If the fixture is aligned and it's alignment recalled in the programs, there is no need to do it anyway.

        Don't know about YOUR controller, but on this old Sharpe32, under MACHINE INTERFACE SETUP I can set the default axis for the machine (not the program). However, even setting X to Y and Y to X, it will still require all the probe angles to be changed in all the programs.

        There is also the possibility of copy & paste w/pattern, which would update the probe angles, however, all your names (features, alignments, dimensions) will change, and depending on how you program, that can and will muck up a lot of stuff.

        If you do an alignment in the program, OR, recall an alignment of that 'fixture' in your programs, the easiest, quickest 'fix' would be to physically rotate the head on the machine. The alignment of the 'fixture' would fix all the rest and no tip angles to change (but you would still have to change the head orientation as previously mentioned.
        sigpic
        Originally posted by AndersI
        I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

        Comment


        • BKulpa
          BKulpa commented
          Editing a comment
          I was referring to the machine interface setup. You don't have to do it for every program, it's a machine setting that's not program specific.
          We use mostly star probes on a fixed head, so I don't think about wrist angles much.
          Last edited by BKulpa; 03-05-2019, 08:35 AM. Reason: Clarificaton on the machine interface statement.

        • SI_GUY_29
          SI_GUY_29 commented
          Editing a comment
          Ok, so the quickest fix you are saying is to redo the alignment, after re-programming the alignment in the program itself. Would it than update the rest of the program/ vector points to the re-programmed alignment. and I can just recall the new alignment and mark out the old one, correct? Than go about re-adjusting my wrist angles and move points as well?

      • #6
        Do a Paste with Pattern of the entire program and then delete the original orientation. ONLY do this on a COPY of the original program.

        Comment


        • #7
          Thank you all for your input. It will still be a couple of days before the new global is operable. I will keep you all informed as I move on into this new adventure of programming for me.

          Comment


          • #8
            How many programs are you talking about here ? Few dozen or a few hundred ? Sometimes starting with a clean slate is nice. Small number of programs you can edit and rewrite. You will have to decide the route you take. Moving the head to match the programs is a good idea but always keep in mind 10 years from now you could have additional CMM's. X being Y and ..... that would make my brain hurt. Decisions that make sense now may be an albatross around your neck down the road. Choose wisely and think long term.

            Comment


            • SI_GUY_29
              SI_GUY_29 commented
              Editing a comment
              There are just two fixtures and programs that I have to do this to. The rest of the programs and fixtures can stay in the same orientation in the xyz. I will just have to edit a couple wrist angles and move points. I hope.

          • #9
            No, don't 'reprogram' the alignment program, simply run it, as long as it has no tip rotations, that is all you need to do. Pcdmis doesn't care HOW you set up a fixture, all it cares about is that you measure the same features in the same order in the same 'direction' (lines) and it doesn't care. It is only when you have probe rotations that it will have an effect. If you align the fixture at A0B0 you can put that fixture anywhere on the machine, at any orientation you want. The problem is if you change the A0B0 to something else. If you rotate your fixture 90 degrees CW (looking down from above), then any AxB90 probe angle will have to be change to AxB0, any AxB-180 will have to be changed to AxB90 and so on. If you have to make the probe rotate the opposite direction from what it did before, you may have to insert additional moves to prevent crashes (in the case of the B-180 to the B90).
            sigpic
            Originally posted by AndersI
            I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

            Comment


            • SI_GUY_29
              SI_GUY_29 commented
              Editing a comment
              Ok, I do the alignment in A0B0 as how I would normally do it except my fixture will be Turned 90 deg to run along in the Y axis instead of the X axis. AND i would just replicate how I take my plane, line, toolball. After alignment is complete, I than would go through all my wrist angles in the program and recalculate them to the 90 deg I adjusted to. Than run the program slowly and adjust the move points, and change any wrist angles, if need be, in the program. Does this sound about right?
              Last edited by SI_GUY_29; 03-07-2019, 05:16 AM.

          • #10
            YEP, that's the ticket!
            sigpic
            Originally posted by AndersI
            I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

            Comment


            • SI_GUY_29
              SI_GUY_29 commented
              Editing a comment
              EASY PEASY! Thank you for helping me obtain this knowledge. Live long and prosper my friend.

          • #11
            Also, you can use the part/machine setup options to 'reorient' the part to the new axis of the machine. Do this by changing the axis in part setup, then 'Auto Position' the part, this 'Places' the part on the table, in the orientation of the machine relative to the new axis that you stated in the setup. But yes, you still have to channge the probe angles
            .Capture.PNG

            Comment


            • #12
              Originally posted by brian.freeman View Post
              Also, you can use the part/machine setup options to 'reorient' the part to the new axis of the machine. Do this by changing the axis in part setup, then 'Auto Position' the part, this 'Places' the part on the table, in the orientation of the machine relative to the new axis that you stated in the setup. But yes, you still have to channge the probe angles
              .Capture.PNG
              BUT the alignment does that. As long as the change in setup does NOT involve what is UP/DOWN it is not needed, unless you want to see the correct probe orientation on the graphics screen in the "pre-alignment" section of the program. Post-alignment, it will be correct. Also, changing that in an existing program can have funky effects, especially if not done 'just-so'.
              sigpic
              Originally posted by AndersI
              I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

              Comment


              • brian.freeman
                brian.freeman commented
                Editing a comment
                I rarely use "Manual" alignments. Just readpoints. So orienting the part to the machine axis, after changing them, allows me to 'adjust' the probe head angles without changing anything else in the program. I don't need to change the move points/clearance planes...etc.

              • SI_GUY_29
                SI_GUY_29 commented
                Editing a comment
                I believe none of our alignments or programs themselves use read points. I personally have never used them and this is the first I have heard of read points. What are these used for and what do they do? From what I just researched, and correct me if I'm wrong. A read point is a manual point that the operator takes to locate the fixture or part. From there you run a dcc alignment. Correct or no?

            • #13
              Yes. No other points or features are taken (manually). Everything is DCC.
              Code:
                            COMMENT/OPER,NO,FULL SCREEN=NO,AUTO-CONTINUE=NO,
                            Place the probe in the center of the hole.
              PNT_HOLE     =FEAT/POINT,CARTESIAN
                            THEO/<238.216,21.0443,108.5083>,<0.9984891,0,-0.0549502>
                            ACTL/<238.227,20.9854,108.504>,<0.9984891,0,-0.0549502>
                            READPOINT/
              CST_HOLE       =ALIGNMENT/START,RECALL:CST_X,LIST=YES
                                ALIGNMENT/TRANS,YAXIS,PNT_HOLE
                                ALIGNMENT/TRANS,ZAXIS,PNT_HOLE
                                ALIGNMENT/TRANS_OFFSET,YAXIS,-21.0443
                                ALIGNMENT/TRANS_OFFSET,ZAXIS,-108.5083
                              ALIGNMENT/END
                              MODE/DCC

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