Alighment 321

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  • Alighment 321

    Hi everyone , I am looking for an explanation for a situation, I had for my 321alighment sometimes when I use plane for my datum AB and C it came out good other times it Don't, and I have to use the plane line and point respectively which will work. Could it be my method of alighment, I will pick all my alighment features and aligh them together but in order of level , rotate , origin or should I aligh each feature separately ?

  • #2
    What I normally do is; 1. Level the plane, 2. lock the Y rotation and 3. Set the X origin. Depending on what version your using, there is a alignment wizard that will walk you through the alignment process. Or, if you are using 3-2-1 then use Quick Align.
    Darroll

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    • #3
      Thank you

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      • Darrollh
        Darrollh commented
        Editing a comment
        No worries! I hope I was able to help you.

    • #4
      Originally posted by Steve R View Post
      Hi everyone , I am looking for an explanation for a situation, I had for my 321alighment sometimes when I use plane for my datum AB and C it came out good other times it Don't, and I have to use the plane line and point respectively which will work. Could it be my method of alighment, I will pick all my alighment features and aligh them together but in order of level , rotate , origin or should I aligh each feature separately ?
      Post some code showing what works and what doesn't - then we can explain what's happening and why.
      Automettech - Automated Metrology Technology

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      • #5
        Steve R One of the cool things about PC DMIS is that there are a billion ways to do anything on it. To answer your question, generally speaking, YES you should lock things as you go along in your program. This is what you're taught early on in training in order to get your brain working in the right direction.

        As you get more comfortable, you'll find that you can cut certain corners (depending on your geometry as well as tolerances) and its up to you as the programmer to use your professional discretion (once you develop some, that is) to know where you can cut said corners & save yourself some programming time.

        Plane. Level plane in A1. Line. Rotate line in A2. Pnt1. Plane is Z, line is Y, pnt is X in A3. This is a great start to any program.

        However, there is nothing wrong (depending on your geometry) to measure three manual planes and then all in 1 alignment level the top, rotate one wall, then set X&Y origins accordingly all in A1. There are many other alignments you can use, we'll get into that later with you if we ever get to that point.

        Play around, see what works for you & your parts, verify everything on the granite, and stay on this forum (you'll get a lot better). If you ever need anything reach out my friend.

        -Dan

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        • #6
          the problem with using 3 planes for an alignment can be the fact that the centroids are what is used. So, top plane (Z level & origin), front plane (Y rotate & origin) and left plane (X origin), if the front plane isn't perfectly square to the top, the origin will change depending on where you take the hits, same with the side plane, the origin will wander about as the centroid changes.

          Try measuring the 3 planes, THEN construct a 3D line between the top & front, and use that for rotate (but to X this time instead of Y when the plane is used). The construct a CORNER POINT from the 3 planes and use that as XYZ origin.

          BUT, you could also try the 3 planes and JUST the corner point, level to a plane, rotate to a plane (which I've never liked to do) and origin to the corner point.
          sigpic
          Originally posted by AndersI
          I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

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          • louisd
            louisd commented
            Editing a comment
            I typically keep the 3/2/1 just that 3pt plane 2pt line and 1pt edge.
            But when I do have to get a corner, I measure the 3 planes, create an intersect line between two, then use the intersect line to pierce the third plane to make a corner point. I guess that's my oldschool methodology before we had fancy corner-point buttons :-S

          • DAN_M
            DAN_M commented
            Editing a comment
            I would never use three planes as my main origin...but what I will frequently do if I have a part with three flats is start m program off with a read pnt above the corner and then do the three planes...level rotate & set origins...and then using that I will go and find datums, build proper origins, and then measure the part

        • #7
          OLD school? Corner point? I'm using V3.7 and it has CONSTRUCT ~ POINT ~ CORNER. So, corner point IS old school.....
          sigpic
          Originally posted by AndersI
          I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

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          • louisd
            louisd commented
            Editing a comment
            That sucks that you are stuck on 3.7. Maybe it was 3.32? 1.8? I go back to validators and floppy discs, lol.
            I guess I never used a corner point. I just made my own via intersect line-> pierce point whenever it was necessary. Goes to show: there's so many ways to tame the demon.

        • #8
          "sucks" begin stuck on v3.7? It was (and IS) one of the best, most stable versions they ever put out. I have 2016 on the other machine, but I do ALL my programming on the old machine with v3.7. AND, for the record, the old machine IS a Validator, from the early/mid 1980's. VALMEAS 200!!!!
          sigpic
          Originally posted by AndersI
          I've got one from September 2006 (bug ticket) which has finally been fixed in 2013.

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          • #9
            Thank you guys for input it was very helpful

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