Styli Stem Preference……

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  • Styli Stem Preference……

    Which do you prefer:
    Carbon Stem Styli or Stainless Steel Styli?
    And Why?
    http://img391.imageshack.us/img391/9...ock5050ra3.jpg

  • #2
    All we have is SS. It is what was here when I started and I haven't had a reason to change. I think the biggest advantage to Carbon is that it is lighter.

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    • #3
      Well that depends on a number of factors, how long is the stem, which type of probe, (tp2, tp20, tp200, sp25, etc), how fast will you be moving and touching, how smooth is your machine, and maybe a few other that do not readily pop into my brain just now.
      In general however,:
      steel is cheap, fairly rigid and durable, but heavy

      ceramic is lighter than steel but more expensive
      ceramic is also cheaper and more rigid than carbon fiber, but very brittle

      carbon fiber is very light & the most expensive.

      I generally prefer carbon or ceramic mostly for weight reasons, but I do have some steel tips I really like, such as the 1.5x30mm, b/c the steel shank in a smaller diameter than the ruby.

      If your machine does not move smoothly or if you try to use too long/heavy a tip you will have many false hits.

      Renishaw can provide you with maximum weight numbers for each style of probe. If you exceed those numbers you could either wear the probe/module out faster, ruin the probe/module, and/or generate bad data.

      As with so many other CMM issues, there is no law or really even exact science, it is more art and trial/error. Hopefully not too much error. HTH

      Last edited by Wes Cisco; 07-13-2006, 02:22 PM.
      sigpic"Hated by Many, Loved by Few" _ A.B. - Stone brewery

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      • #4
        What Wes said. I love ceramic, it has allowed me to rotate larger rubys to angles I was not confident with in the past. It also has a slightly smaller shank diameter than the carbon fiber.
        <internet bumper sticker goes here>

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        • #5
          Love the Carbon fiber....but the shank diameter steers me more towards the SS or Ceramic... Will only use the ceramics on proven programs...

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          • #6
            personally I would stay away from Carbon fiber if you do analog (constant contact) scanning, IF you have long extensions. I have found they 'chatter' more often than ceramic or SS. For normal probing or long probe needs they are great!

            my .02
            sigpiccall me "Plum Crazy"....but you only go around once!

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            • #7
              Nothing but carbide for me. Almost all of our probes are small and I'd reathre break one than run on a bent shank and give nothing but bad data all day or all week or all month....

              Duane
              Xcel & MicroVal Pfx & Global 37mr4 thru 2012mr1sp3
              Contura Calypso 5.4

              Lord, keep Your arm around my shoulder and Your hand over my mouth. Amen.

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              • #8
                Bent shank, a problem??

                I'm new at this, but I don't care if the shank is moderately bent so
                long as it's been quailfied since the last bend
                "listening for the last trump... looking toward the eastern sky"

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by MJBolster
                  I'm new at this, but I don't care if the shank is moderately bent so
                  long as it's been quailfied since the last bend
                  Ooooh! Thats gonna generate some noise. I'm with you as long as you are not shanking on your hits AND you check the tip under magnification for chips or cracks AND you qualify after any of the following:

                  1) The probe gets bent again.
                  2) You unscrew any part of assembly.

                  I have actually straightened probes that were bent about .010 off. As long as you qualify the tip the bend shoud be compensated for.

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                  • #10
                    No doubt. With all of your cautions noted. I work with some guys
                    who think everything about a stylus needs to be perfect. I have rotated unused new tips fresh out of the box to see that the spheres aren't perfectly
                    concentric with the shank- but close enough to avoid shanking.
                    "listening for the last trump... looking toward the eastern sky"

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                    • #11
                      If you need long styli (>50mm), hands down, cabon fiber! Causes a lot less false triggers and gives real good form.


                      Jan.
                      ***************************
                      PC-DMIS/NC 2010MR3; 15 December 2010; running on 18 machine tools.
                      Romer Infinite; PC-DMIS 2010 MR3; 15 December 2010.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by dwade
                        Nothing but carbide for me. Almost all of our probes are small and I'd reathre break one than run on a bent shank and give nothing but bad data all day or all week or all month....

                        Duane
                        That's what we are doing here. I've only been here since they've gone to all carbide, but I've heard the stories of probes made into fishhooks during a crash, and then the concern that a probe got bent slightly and it's not apparent to the naked eye and what kind of data are we getting. Try to bend a carbide probe, and you'll know it.
                        Kevin N. Thompson - Thompson Digital Image
                        Quality Manager - Rj Link International

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                        • #13
                          Carbide has a distinctive "ting" to it as it crashes. Just rumor though, I wouldn't know
                          sigpic Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely, but rather a skid in broadside, totally worn, proclaiming WOW What a ride!

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                          • #14
                            Thanks for all the input.
                            You have been a big help.
                            http://img391.imageshack.us/img391/9...ock5050ra3.jpg

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Andrew Gardner
                              Carbide has a distinctive "ting" to it as it crashes. Just rumor though, I wouldn't know
                              It is a beautiful "ting" and when it happens you'll be lucky to find all of the missing pieces. Not that I would ever do such a thing....
                              Xcel & MicroVal Pfx & Global 37mr4 thru 2012mr1sp3
                              Contura Calypso 5.4

                              Lord, keep Your arm around my shoulder and Your hand over my mouth. Amen.

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